A question from Jenny PART 2

On Tuesday I shared some ideas about how Jenny could negotiate her salary for a new job. In case you missed it, you can read Part 1 HERE

Next week I’m going to dive a little deeper into your power in these interviews. I know it feels lopsided, like you’re at the mercy of the hiring manager. But you have a lot more power than you think!

Before we dive into the second half of Jenny’s message, know that these are all ideas that have worked in the past for me and my clients.

Every conversation is different and unpredictable because you never really know what’s happening with the other person. People react in different ways. I try to break down best practices for you. If you have other ideas, please share them with me!

And for every situation where these ideas work, there’s one where they don’t. In life, your best practice is to try new things, things that may or may not work. And just because they don’t work in one conversation, they may work in another.

The more tools you have in your toolbox, the better you’re able to navigate these conversations.

Ok, in the second part of Jenny’s message, she said, 

“It seems that in order to move forward, I have to be ok with the given salary range, which for two interviews, I have said the below quotes.

I feel pushed into a corner and don’t believe my responses have been setting me up for a successful negotiation for the actual conversation in the future.

1) ‘Salary is not the only thing I’m looking for, so I’m ok with this range and would like to discuss more when as we move forward.’

2) ‘This range is lower than expected, is this a final number or is there room to discuss?’ Usually not much wiggle room, and I revert to line #1.

I still want to move forward bc I’m interested in the companies but would like to position myself better when it comes to salary negotiations.

Do you have any suggestions in these situations? Hope this is a good topic for us (the email community) to discuss, thanks!”

Let’s dive in! 
Jenny said,“It seems that in order to move forward, I have to be ok with the given salary range…” 

IDEAS
Sometimes the salary is not negotiable. But you still owe it to yourself to ask. You’re building resilience to keep asking, even when you get a “no.”

I’m not saying to keep asking the same person over and over, I’m saying to ask each time you interview for a new job.

“1) ‘Salary is not the only thing I’m looking for, so I’m ok with this range and would like to discuss more when as we move forward.’”

IDEAS
Companies want to know that you are not only interested in yourself. Try adding some of the complimenting feature from PART 1 here, “Even if the salary is not negotiable, I am still excited and very interested in the job.”

And then explore other benefits that they offer. Sometimes benefits are negotiable, depending on the company and your level in the company. You might be able to get some telecommuting days or additional vacation days. And at many companies these things are not negotiable either.

Try something like, “If the salary is not negotiable, I’d like to discuss the benefits other than salary…”

And then add this great question that reminds them that you are interested in THEM as much as they are interested in YOU, “I’d like to contribute to the growth of the company and I am interested in what my career path can be here. What do the previous people in this job move on to? Is there a career path for me in this position?”

That information will help you find out how quickly new opportunities may become available, at which time you would be able to negotiate your salary. And you’ll be doing it from a strong position, having proven yourself as an asset to THEM.

“2) ‘This range is lower than expected, is this a final number or is there room to discuss?’ Usually not much wiggle room, and I revert to line #1.”

IDEAS
This is still a good question even if the answer is no. And it may be no 2 out of 3 times. It’s still important to ask because you won’t get a yes if you don’t ask!

If you have already said this (from PART 1), “I’m really excited about this opportunity. I think my skills are matched well with the job (you can go on as long as you like in this section). I’ve done some research on Glassdoor, Salary.com and I’ve spoken with colleagues in the field at other companies. My research tells me that this position pays up to $X.”

Then you might say, “So I’m surprised that your range is much lower.”

And then just be quiet to see what they say. Depending on what they say, it may be “well, that’s what we have budgeted” THEN you can say, “Is this a final number or is there room to discuss?”

They may say it’s a final number and you can’t negotiate what isn’t negotiable.

If you’ve decided that you want the job even if the salary isn’t negotiable, you can go back to, “Even if the salary is not negotiable, I am still excited and very interested in the job. And although I would love to take this job, I’m sure you understand how important it is for me to negotiate the best salary I can.”

Be authentic. Be yourself. Don’t give up. Be resilient.

Do you have other ideas to share with Jenny or questions you’d like me to address? Comment below.

Warmly,
Melissa
Could you do me a favor and click on the link below to tell me when it comes to negotiating, what is the single biggest challenge, frustration or problem that you’ve been struggling with?
– or –
It only takes a minute or two and would mean the world to me.
Let’s connect!
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